Host adaptation and variation in septoria nodorum
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Host adaptation and variation in septoria nodorum by Anne E. Osbourn

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Published by University of Birmingham in Birmingham .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Thesis (Ph.D.) - University of Birmingham, Dept of Genetics.

Statementby Anne Elisabeth Osbourn.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14832939M

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Variation in eleetrophoretie karyotype between strains of Septoria nodorum, falls into the group of agriculturally important fungi. S. nodorum (teleomorph = Leptosphaeria nodorum) is a filamentous Ascomycete and an important pathogen time and place of origin as well as host adaptation. After. 18Cited by:   Filamentous fungi rapidly evolve in response to environmental selection pressures, exemplified by their genomic plasticity. Parastagonospora nodorum, a fungal pathogen of wheat and causal agent of septoria nodorum blotch, responds to selection pressure exerted by its host, influencing the gain, loss, or functional diversification of putative effector genes. Whole genome resequencing of Author: Jonathan K. Richards, Eva H. Stukenbrock, Eva H. Stukenbrock, Jessica Carpenter, Zhaohui Liu, Christ. Variation in Metabolite Production by Septoria nodorum Isolates Adapted to Wheat or to Barley Article in Journal of Phytopathology (5‐6) - May with 11 Reads How we measure 'reads'. causal agent of septoria nodorum blotch, responds to selection pressure exerted by its host, influencing the gain, loss, or functional diversification of virulence determinants, known as effector genes. Whole genome resequencing of P. nodorum isolates collected from.

All observations confirm that every Septoria nodorum isolate is a population possessing a great flexibility, on which a host-plant can exert a selection pressure by means of its genotype and (or) its cytoplasm. As the difference between the genotype or cytoplasm of alien hosts and those of cultivated wheat increases, the resulting re-isolate becomes more agressive towards these wheats.   Author summary Parastagonospora nodorum is an economically important pathogen of wheat, employing proteinaceous effectors to cause disease. Recognition of effectors by host susceptibility genes often leads to the elicitation of programmed cell death. However, little is known on the correlation between effector diversity and the spatial distribution of host resistance/susceptibility or the. Plant Disease Plant Disease Effect of Inoculation with Selected Isolates of Stagonospora nodorum on Field Evaluations of Host Resistance in Winter Wheat D. E. Fraser, Delta and Pine Land Company, Hartsville, SC ; J. P. Murphy, Department of Crop Science, and S. Leath, Department of Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh ; and D.   We identified allelic variation at two major loci, -2A.1 and -5A.1, showing consistent and additive effects on SNB field resistance. Validation of -2A.1 across genetic backgrounds further highlights its usefulness for marker-assisted selection. Septoria nodorum blotch (SNB) is a disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum and T. durum) caused by the necrotrophic .

  Septoria tritici blotch (also known as speckled leaf spot), Stagonospora nodorum blotch and tan spot (also known as yellow leaf spot) are the three most frequently occurring leaf blotch diseases of wheat in Ohio. These diseases all have the potential to cause significant grain yield and quality losses if the environmental conditions are favorable for their spread and development during late. Filamentous fungi rapidly evolve in response to environmental selection pressures in part due to their genomic plasticity. Parastagonospora nodorum, a fungal pathogen of wheat and causal agent of septoria nodorum blotch, responds to selection pressure exerted by its host, influencing the gain, loss, or functional diversification of virulence determinants, known as effector genes. Genomics of Zymoseptoria tritici The genome of Z. tritici consists of thirteen core chromosomes and up to eight accessory chromosomes that can be lost without a noticeable effect on pathogen fitness (Goodwin et al., ; Wittenberg et al., ). Z. tritici has the highest number of accessory chromosomes identified to date. These accessory chromosomes exhibit extensive absence/presence.   Local adaptation drives the diversification of effectors in the fungal wheat pathogen Parastagonospora nodorum in the United States. Parastagonospora nodorum, a fungal pathogen of wheat and causal agent of septoria nodorum blotch, responds to selection pressure exerted by its host, influencing the gain, loss, or functional diversification.